Villanelle

I was reading an article on poetry yesterday when I came across the word ‘villanelle’ which was used with no explanations or clarifications and as always I wondered what it meant.

I decided to keep all these definitions of words connected to the art world together here so I can refer back to them.

A villanelle (also known as villanesque) is a nineteen-line poetic form consisting of five tercets followed by a quatrain. There are two refrains and two repeating rhymes, with the first and third line of the first tercet repeated alternately until the last stanza, which includes both repeated lines. The villanelle is an example of a fixed verse form. The word derives from Latin, then Italian, and is related to the initial subject of the form being the pastoral.

The villanelle consists of five stanzas of three lines (tercets) followed by a single stanza of four lines (a quatrain) for a total of nineteen lines. It is structured by two repeating rhymes and two refrains: the first line of the first stanza serves as the last line of the second and fourth stanzas, and the third line of the first stanza serves as the last line of the third and fifth stanzas. The rhyme-and-refrain pattern of the villanelle can be schematized as A1bA2 abA1 abA2 abA1 abA2 abA1A2 where letters (“a” and “b”) indicate the two rhyme sounds, upper case indicates a refrain (“A”), and superscript numerals (1 and 2) indicate Refrain 1 and Refrain 2.

Love the amount of information available on the Internet.

MFA Hatton Gallery 2013 – Newcastle University

Again I came across this by accident, and again it was the last day so I really couldn’t dedicate as much time to looking at the works as I would like to. Disappointingly there didn’t seem to be a catalogue of the works as in the earlier BA show had.

Information was much harder to come by this time as well, fewer of the artists had cards or flyers to even give contact points, I eventually found the site for the show but that wasn’t that easy either.

So onto the artists (in no particular order);

  1. Lyn Hagan (in collaboration with Agustin Fernandez
    ‘Tony and Angela – The Opera’
    sound work with embroidered dress, referencing Maxican drug culture and cartels, murder, hail terms, romance between Tony and Angela – the ‘soap’ opera
    Also ‘Drug Tales’, ‘Love Tales’, and ‘Crime Tales’
  2. Vivianne Chatel
    ‘Whence comes the light’
    large cardboard structures intersecting with the space of the room, making new spaces and habitations within the installation – entrances and exits through the structures inviting exploration, layers
  3. Gareth Hudson
    ‘In Ecstasy’
    large video/light/sound piece – visceral, mythical, ecstatic, using choral sounds linked with slowed video from a heavy metal concert – passion
  4. Zoe Allen
    ‘Genius Loci’
    found object sculptures, exploring spatial relationships/juxtapositions
  5. Bex Harvey
  6. Lorna Bryan
  7. Kevin Christensen
  8. Imogen Coates
    fantastical creatures – anime, disney, mythic
  9. Iolando Rocha
    ‘Interweaving and crisscrossing’
    raised shanty town structure – reminded me of the bridge from William Gibson – overhanging, accretion – growing through the structure of the exhibition space – barred on the inside – no thoroughfare
  10. Scott Aaron Tait
    ‘We are the forest dwellers’
    sound and video – dodecahedrons – private mythology
  11. Jennifer Prevatt
    papercut forest with sound piece – alluding to Sleeping Beauty, roses and thorns, an inked forest
  12. Kate Liston and Dan Wilde
    spatial sculpture with sound and video – reimagining of domestic/office spaces
  13. Theresa Poulton
  14. William Flynn
    pencil exploration of textures, quite lo-fi, inhabited the long gallery really well
  15. Joshua Ipoot
  16. Rebecca Woods
    ‘Story House’
    dark, wondrous, childhood – lamps, magic lanterns, whispered words
  17. Samantha Cary
  18. Sam Thorpe
  19. Kathryn Brame
  20. Katie Dent

If I’ve missed anyone, either the room wasn’t open or I just couldn’t find it in the lovely maze of the department rooms and corridors.

Essence of the North

Curlew
Curlew

What is the “Essence of the North?”

That is what is being asked by The Northerner Blog in the Guardian today. They are asking for contributors to post an image that captures the essence of the North.

Whose North? There is always the chocolate box image of Dales and Moors, unbroken wilderness, apart from James Herriot careening across them in his old car. Hills and lakes, unspoilt beaches and little stone villages shimmering in the sunset.

Townies
Townies

There is the Christian North, the North of Cathedrals, Saints and Holy Islands. Pilgrimages across the land, fleeing from Viking pillagers, writing works of illuminated art and deciding the way forward for the catholic church.

Or there is the smashed North, the North of Thatcher’s cruelty and industrial decline. A once proud heritage of steel and chemical works, pit villages, ship building and union activity. The Jarrow marchers and Quaker sensibilities. The first locomotives and the crucible of Britain’s industrial revolution.

Book of Kells
Book of Kells

The North I know is an area where people live in great diversity and try to get on with their lives, but has time to commission some of the best public art in the country and has made a feature of regeneration through art projects such as The Sage, The Baltic, Temenos, Hepworth Gallery and The Angel of the North. This large scale development mixes well with the industrial heritage of the area and sits well, all of the above is the North I know and to try and distill an essence is not really needed, just celebrate it all, in images, words and imagination.